Never told you about the Crush! (A holiday story that starts in September)

On Thursday afternoon of that last long September weekend before this school year started, some friends and I drove across the mountains to the heart of wine country for Catch the Crush, the yearly celebration of the Washington grape harvest. (The “crush” starts the process of making wine. The business of stepping barefoot into a barrel of grapes?–That’s one way to do a crush.)

On Friday Denise and Diana went off for a warm-up round of golf, so I was on my own. I first set out for the Bookwalter Winery, but they weren’t open yet (why not?–it was already 10:00 in the morning!). So I walked down the road to Barnard Griffin. The person setting up there explained how the Crush wine-tastings work: to sample the wines they’ve opened for the tasting, you pay a small fee (say five dollars), which usually will apply against any wine you buy from them.  Or, for I think $30, you can buy a Catch the Crush Premier Pass passport, a booklet that has a page for each of the wineries taking part in the promotion (38 this year!). At each stop, you skip the fee and get a stamp in your booklet. (Was it a good deal? Probably, given the number of wineries we visited, but some of them were waiving the fee anyway.)

Also, as I learned at Barnard Griffin, for about five dollars you can buy a commemorative wine glass from most of the wineries. I went for it! (–And it was only my first one! By Sunday I had accumulated a glass from almost every winery I visited. In fact, as I click away on this post, I have a full one sitting right here on my desk–a nice stemless model from Chandler Reach.)

At any rate, Barnard Griffin gave me my first wine surprise of the trip–their 2010 Tulip riesling. I’m usually wary of rieslings (wouldn”t want to stray into sweet territory!) but I liked this off-dry one best out of their whole tasting lineup. I also learned a little about how to concentrate on the taste and see how it unfolds as you savor it. (The person pouring for me clearly loved the wines, and knew how to help a novice like me appreciate them!)

After Barnard Griffin (nice folks!), I walked back over to Bookwalter. This winery really exercises the “book” motif. The wines have names like “protagonist,” “subplot,” and “foreshadow.” They have a “book club,” and they offer a “library” of wines. I tasted a couple of outstanding reds, especially the 2008 Foreshadow merlot and 2009 Antagonist syrah-cabernet-malbec blend. (But seriously–completely out of commemorative wine glasses, on the first day of the biggest tourist event of the year?) This is where I also heard the first throat-clearings of what would be a trip-long running conversation about AVAs. I already had a sketchy idea about AVAs (American Viticultural Areas), also called appellations, but now I was right in the neighborhood. That 2009 Antagonist?–mostly grapes from the Columbia Valley AVA, with some from Elephant Mountain Vineyards, on the southern slope of Rattlesnake Ridge, in the new appellation of Rattlesnake Hills. Take Highway 82 up toward Zillah–you can’t miss it.

Next, I made my way over to my old friend Hogue Cellars, one of the largest Washington wineries. (Their red label is a staple on grocery store shelves.) These folks make some really good wines! A standout that was new to me was the 2010 Terroir bII, a Bordeaux-style blend of 90% semillon and 10% sauvignon blanc, made from grapes grown on the Fries Vineyard in the Wahluke Slope AVA. (The Fries family owns the Duck Pond and Desert Wind labels, but also, I gather, sells grapes to other winemakers.) I also really liked the 2008 Reserve chardonnay, from grapes grown in the Yakima Valley AVA; they produced only 100 barrels of it that year. (I know this because the enthusiastic young pourer told me so. This and much, much more.)  I usually just grab their chard, but I’ll explore a little deeper on the Hogue shelf after this tasting!

Then, after a couple of false starts, I made my way to the Desert Wind Winery. (It’s right there on that hill!–Why can’t I find my turn??)  I sensed that lunch was getting important, so I went straight to the winery’s restaurant, Mojave by Picazo. Good choice! I had the blue crab “cigars”–hand-rolled feather-light blue corn tortillas filled with blue crab, served with a tart fresh tomatillo salsa. (Wait, aren’t blue crabs from the Atlantic coast? What a hike to eastern Washington! But I digress.) The side of gargonzola potato salad was spiked with tiny bacon bits and bright with green onions. Tasty! With it, I had a glass of Desert Wind sauvignon blanc (made from grapes grown in the Wahluke Slope appellation in the larger Columbia Valley AVA). And what a dessert!–molten Mexican chocolate lava cake with a lightly salted caramel drizzle. Had to wait for it to cool a bit!–Not easy.

I caught chef Chris Nokes to ask him about the “cigar” filling, which had been riffling some little edge of a food memory. “Think spinach artichoke dip, but without the spinach, crab instead, rolled up in a corn tortilla. Add a touch of parmesan.”  Got it! After lunch, I took in their tasting and found two more excellent whites–a slightly oaked 2009 chardonnay and a 2009 semillon.

Sound like a lot of wine?–Remember: in a tasting, you tilt your nose down into your glass and breathe over the little splash of wine at the bottom, then you tip your glass up and moisten your mouth with the wine and breathe again. Maybe you swallow a trickle–then you dump out the rest into a big jar on the counter. This is wine-tasting, not wine-swigging. Which is why I wasn’t sprawled on the gravel out in the parking lot.

But I wasn’t done yet! After my late lunch I met up post-golf with Denise and Diana and we hit four more tastings. Now that I had the two of them to talk to, my note-taking tailed off, but at least I noted our stops: Airfield Estates (another winery working a motif; we tasted wines named Runway, and Aviator, and Lightning); Coyote Canyon Winery, where my pick was the 2010 Albariño, a Spanish grape that Coyote Canyon was apparently the first in Washington to plant, at Coyote Canyon Vineyards in the Horse Heaven Hills AVA; Milbrandt Vineyards, with its own fantastic riesling fragrant with fresh grapefruit; and Apex Cellars Winery, where I found maybe my best wine of the day, a beautifully creamy oaked chardonnay. (I tend to choose whites over reds, and this trip was no exception.) Finally, done for the day!

On Saturday, now with reinforcements (friends CJ and John had pulled in on Friday evening), we headed for Red Mountain. The Red Mountain AVA, a triangular wedge just east across the Yakima River from Benton City, is, at 4,000 acres (with only 600 of that in cultivation), the smallest appellation in Washington. Our map showed 14 wineries in the AVA, but we tasted at just two. At the Kiona Vineyards Winery, the tasting stretches out along a couple of intersecting long rooms, each with stations offering several wines. I was taken with a spicy rosé (I believe it was their Mourvédre rosé, though they also have one made from sangiovese grapes; my notes fail me here). I also really surprised myself by loving a late harvest sweet wine! Next we visited Tapteil Vineyards Winery, where the cabernet sauvignon was most interesting to me (also a surprise because of its strong tannin, which I don’t usually go for). The Tapteil tasting room was refreshingly homey and the people were good-humored and helpful.

Then we zoomed back westward to Prosser to take in four more wineries. The three-story stucco villa of Chandler Reach Vineyards whisks you off to Tuscany before you even get in the door, and the wine selections tilt Italian as well, especially their Corella sangiovese blend. But we also tasted a viognier. (Floral; some like it, some don’t. I don’t always, but I did like this one!)

By now, mid-Day Two, I had given up trying to take pictures, and I began to notice a certain truculence in my reactions to the wines I was tasting. I know that we stopped at Hightower Cellars, but my only note, quoted completely, is “cab sauv.” I was already familiar with Kestrel Vintners; I had visited their tasting room a couple of years ago, and had belonged to their wine club for a year after that. They have a great old-vine chardonnay and a very light sauvignon blanc, as well as an array of reds from easy quaffers like Lady in Red to serious high-end merlots and cabernet sauvignons, But by the time we got there, my palate was too exhausted to detect much beyond “red” and “white.” I didn’t write a single note! On the up side, they were serving a cheerful spiced-wine punch that brightened us up considerably.  Finally, at our last stop, Mercer Estates, I tasted a 2009 pinot gris that I could rise to “love”–but I can  only guess why because I didn’t make a single other comment! And so my wine-tasting shambled to an end.

But now, with the end-of-year holidays finally here, I find myself buying a lot of wine for my friends, and as I reach for this bottle or that, I often let my hand be guided by my memories of these tasting rooms and labels, these helpful people, friendly winery dogs, and lovely golden fields braided with rows of grapevines. Desert Wind, Kestrel, Barnard Griffin, Kiona, Mercer, Apex, Milbrandt. And I still have my slender bottle of First Crush, Kiona’s 2006 Late Harvest Sauvignon Blanc, a liquid-gold dessert wine produced from nearly frozen grapes. Maybe I’ll open it this New Year’s Eve to sip with my own attempt at  Mexican chocolate lava cake!

On the Sunday of that long weekend, we got up early to make it to the Prosser airport by 6:00 (that’s in the morning) for the Great Prosser Balloon Rally. Look!–They launched a whole blue sky of ornaments! Happy wine tasting, and Happy New Year!

Eating and drinking well in Ann Arbor!

A few weeks back, I finally worked out a way to spend a weekend visiting my friend Steph in Ann Arbor! A lovely small city that is home to a large university, Ann Arbor can offer first-class amenities in pretty much every category of eat, drink, and be merry, so  Steph and I didn’t stint.

Friday evening Steph picked me up at the Detroit airport and took me straight to a wonderful Ann Arbor wine-tasting put on by The Produce Station, with stewards pouring tastes from all the major wine regions of the world. Luckily, the hors d’oeuvres were plentiful and hearty!–We munched as we sipped, and kept both our palates clean and our heads (reasonably) clear. Then we went out to Zingerman’s Deli for hefty Reuben sandwiches dressed up with extra  chopped chicken liver! Think of the most exotic condiment you can, cured meat, or cheese, or oil–Zingerman’s Deli has it, and the incredibly pleasant and knowledgeable staff want to tell you about it. So we were there until closing!

Saturday we straggled down to the kitchen later than we planned and trifled with tea and toast. After taking care of a couple of work projects (part of my excuse for being there!), we polished off the rest of our Reubens and went out to the markets. Ann Arbor has an excellent open-air farmers market, with tons of beautiful produce, flowers, and crafts; we also visited the nearby Kerrytown shops–fish market, cheese shop, Sparrow Meats, everything! And we finished up at nearby Tracklements to get some some beautiful lox. Tracklements is popular!–It looked like a big slice of Ann Arbor was already in line. But proprietor T.R. Durham and his staff seemed to know everybody by name and custom order. Steph was no exception!–She got our lox thin-sliced. (Here she is in her terrific faux-fur coat.)

At this point we had to hustle back to the house because Steph’s early-music group was about to show up for practice. I got to sprawl on the sofa for a couple of hours and pretend to read, reveling in the woof and warp of soprano, mezzo, and contralto, catching brief glimpses of their expertise at work as they stopped, backed up, repeated, discussed. Fascinating!

By the time they finished, we hadn’t eaten for hours, so we went out and had a great fish dinner at The Earle! I didn’t take notes on my dish but I remember that it was a beautiful whitefish, well-prepared and tastily garnished.

How could there be more to eat in Ann Arbor?!? Did I mention that Zingerman’s actually has five different restaurants? So on Sunday morning, before heading me back to the airport, we went off for brunch to Zingerman’s Roadhouse. The place was packed, of course; we decided to eat at the counter. The same friendly staff, the same hearty, delicious food! I had to have the hash with poached eggs, accompanied by warm and earthy bread and jam. And you bet I ate it all.

T. R. Durham of Tracklements has produced a great cookbook, The Smoked Seafood Cookbook: Easy Innovative Recipes from America’s Best Fish Smokery. Smoked fish has not played much of a role in my diet so far, but this book’s wide-ranging recipes have opened my eyes to the possibilities. I’ll cook up something soon and share it with you!

More cheese, please!

You may recall my post (almost a year ago now!) about Cheese 101, the excellent introduction to world-class cheeses by cheesemonger Sheri LaVigne. Browsing in Sheri’s store The Calf & Kid after class, I picked up Tami Parr’s great book on the Artisan Cheese of the Pacific Northwest and proceeded to munch my way through a big chunk of it. So how could I resist when Sheri offered a second cheese class hosted by Tami herself?

We convened once again at the common table in Sitka & Spruce (Matt Dillon’s very uncommon restaurant in the Melrose Market). Sheri introduced us to Tami and then we settled in to learn about a baker’s dozen of local cheeses. (It had to have been a challenge to select them; since 2000, when the Northwest had just six cheesemakers, the number in Oregon and Washington has grown to 72–and counting!)

We tasted our way around a first plate of eleven cheeses, starting with a fresh chevre from Yarmouth Farms (at high noon in this picture). I’ve mentioned Louise Yarmouth’s French Creek cheese before, but I gather that she now produces only this chevre. [This just in!–Sheri tells me I got it wrong. In fact, Louise also produces bloomy rind cheeses and two or three aged hard cheeses. Better and better!] To make the chevre, she blends the milk from the four breeds that make up her 25-goat herd. It’s an airy fluffy chevre that I liked so well I went back for a little tub of it; I served it on crackers with just a simple herb garnish.

The next two cheeses (at 1:00 and 2:00 on the plate) are Dinah’s Cheese from Kurtwood Farms on Vashon Island and Seastack Cheese from the Mt. Townsend Creamery over in Port Townsend. (Dinah is one of Kurt Timmermeier’s six Jersey cows; I told you earlier about his adventures becoming a farmer. ) Both of these soft-ripened cheeses, made from pasteurized cow’s milk, are buttery, earthy, and  aromatic. Not from Seattle?–You can get them in many regional grocery stores that have fine-cheese counters.

The next cheese, an “ashed camembert” from Tieton Creamery in Yakima, was a real find. Made from pasteruized goat and sheep’s milk (Tami tells us that owners Laurie and Ruth mix the milk of their 16 goats and nine sheep), this soft-rind cheese was creamy and rich. I went back to get more of it too, but ended up with a different camembert–also made from goat and sheep milk, but not ashed. This very soft, pungent camembert was lovely but I’m holding out for the one I first tasted; stay tuned!

Dutchman’s Flat, the cheese next on the plate, is a raw goat’s milk cheese made by Juniper Grove Farm in Redmond (no, not that Redmond–this one is in Oregon). I found it a little chalky; Tami says it is very good with fig compote and similar cooked fruit.

On to the firm cheeses. At 6:00 is Mopsey’s Best, a manchego-style cheese made from raw sheep’s milk that had a nice rich, deep flavor. (Maybe because sheep’s milk is 8% fat or more, compared to a meager 4% for cows and goats?) Went out and got more!–It’s great for simple munching.

The next two cheeses, Dulcinea from Larks Meadow in Rexburg, Idaho and Brindisi from Willamette Valley Cheese in Salem, Oregon, were both really nice, but I especially loved the last of this batch, the Classico Reserve made by Tumalo Farms in Bend, Oregon. (The owner, I gather, made his fortune from WebMD and then retired to tend his 300 goats.) Like a Gouda, it is brined, and has a vaguely sweet taste and a firm but creamy texture with a tiny bit of crunch. I couldn’t resist more of this one, either–I served it with just a curl of salami on top.

The final two cheeses on this plate were the blues. (My notes tell me that, to get the characteristic blue marbling of this cheese, the makers pierce the cheese wheel as it ages to enable the mold to grow inside.) The first one, Billy Blue, from Oak Leaf Creamery in Grants Pass, Oregon, is unusual in that it is made from goat’s milk. The second one, Caveman Blue from the Rogue Creamery in Central Point, Oregon, was well-known to me (another well-established producer whose products appear in better-cheese cases in area grocery stores), and still remains a favorite–sweet and pungent at the same time. Get some, if you like blue!

Eleven cheeses!–But we weren’t done. The last two tastes were really desserts made from cheese. The first was Chocolate Goat Chevre Truffle from Briar Rose Creamery in Dundee, Oregon–made with just those ingredients. So good I wanted to throw myself on the floor with it. (But when I went back to get more–say a gallon or so–I learned that the makers have suspended production for a couple of months while they move to a new farm. Trying to be patient here . . .) The second taste was Frangelico from River’s Edge Chevre in Logsden, Oregon–fresh chevre, Frangelico liqueur, roasted hazelnuts, and brown sugar. Also delicious! (but for a chocoholic like me, doomed by coming second).

Get all these cheeses and more from Sheri at The Calf and Kid!–She has an amazing selection, sourced not just locally but internationally, and she and her other staff are knowledgeable and friendly. Not sure?–Ask for a taste; they are happy to help.  And be sure to visit Tami’s website, the Pacific Northwest Cheese Project, for cheese recipes, news, profiles, and much, much more!

Locally grown meats–Get to know your rancher

I got the word late last week that Paulette Lefever Holbrook was making another run to deliver her meat products in Seattle last Saturday, so I signed up fast and scored my third community-supported-agriculture order this year from her ranch in Goldendale (about four hours east of the mountains and down near the Columbia River).

Paulette and her kids take service seriously! They wheeled my order not just to my door but to my open freezer. Here are Conor (thirteen years old now) and Madison (fifteen), about to lug the cooler up my front steps. (I introduced you to Conor a while back in a post about Lefever Holbrook Ranch lamb riblets.)

After we got the meat in the freezer, I got a family shot of Paulette, Madison, and Conor in my kitchen. This time, they brought me country ribs, baby back ribs, bacon, pork shoulder roast, and lamb shanks. Here’s my new stash in the basement freezer (with a few items left from before as well). And just to be nice, they brought me some cherries and a bag of gooseberries!

These people know how to work hard. In addition to the pork, lamb, duck, beef, and bison that I’ve bought from them so far, they raise turkeys and have just added rabbits. They raise all these animals, manage the slaughtering, and bring the meats to market. Not busy enough? They’ve added The Little Sheep Bakery, turning out artisan breads, cakes and cookies. They have garden beds with horseradish, shallots, garlic, and French string beans ready for harvest now. And lots of raspberries! Oh, and the catering business. (I think I’ve left out a few things.)

We sat out back and chatted for a little bit, and the conversation turned to leaf lard (fat from around the pig’s kidneys; remember my rendering exercise?). Paulette tells me that they are harvesting another pig this week; she will talk to the butcher about cutting me some of this “gold standard” lard.

I still haven’t been over to visit the ranch, but we talked about my coming over in September. (By then I should be able to pick up my next lamb order.) Stay tuned.

If you live in this region, look into participating in the CSA program that Paulette, Conor, and Madison offer. Don’t picture a side of beef hanging in your basement!–You can scale your participation to your family’s needs, and the meats arrive either paper-wrapped or vacuum-sealed in plastic. You will love the products and enjoy getting to know these great folks. Here’s how to get in touch with them:

  • Lefever Holbrook Ranch, 1098 Hwy 97, Goldendale, WA 98620, 509-773-3443
  • papa_pklh@yahoo.com

Los Reyes Tienda Mexicana–for Mexican ingredients, go see Mario!

I’m on a mission to make home-made tamales! And one of my biggest challenges has been finding fresh, traditional ingredients. Problem solved!–I’ve discovered Los Reyes Tienda Mexicana!

If you read my “Mex auténtica” post, you know that I recently took a class in Mexican cooking from chef Suzanne Hunter. Suzanne steered us toward a couple of resources for authentic ingredients, including the Los Reyes store, so I headed off to Bothell to check it out. What a find! Not only did I get the fresh masa, corn husks, and banana leaves I needed for my tamales, I also scored some Mexican brown sugar (called “piloncillo” for its cone shape) and Mexican cinnamon (canela). And (if I’d had sense enough to bring my list of ingredients) I’m betting that, among the store’s extensive collection, I would have found all the chiles and other ingredients called for in our mole negro recipe. Did I mention the wall of Mexican salsas and hot sauces? It was like being back in Oaxaca again!

Owner Mario Reyes helped me pull all this stuff together–banana leaves from the chest freezer, masa from the cold case–all the while chatting with me. He tells me that the shop has been around for twelve years!–I wish I’d found it sooner. He also put up gracefully with my fractured Spanish, and even encouraged me to come out there to practice on him. (He’ll be sorry; I’m going to take him up on it.)

Mario tells me that his daughter is working on the store’s new website. But for now, you can find the store here: http://bothell.komonews.com/business-directory/food-dining/647594/los-reyes-mexican-store. And go see Mario! The city is working on the street right in front of the shop; he has put a sign out there close to the roadway, but it’s kind of over-powered by the road equipment. So keep an eye out for the driveway–you can turn in and park right in front.

Los Reyes Tienda Mexicana (Los Reyes Mexican Store), (425) 415-0922, 17208 Bothell Way NE, Bothell, WA.

Taylor Shellfish Grand Opening and other action at Melrose Market!

Melrose Market was hoppin’ yesterday when I went by to buy my pork fat! The big event was the Grand Opening of Taylor Shellfish Farms‘ new Seattle store. The grills were cranked up and covered with oysters on the half-shell, and at the other end of the booth, paper boats of curried mussels on rice were sailing quickly into the crowd’s hands. You had to move fast to get a serving, but it wasn’t hard to tell who the go-to guy was! (He looked like he was having a great time, but seriously, how do they get people to do these things?)

Both oysters and mussels were delicious! (I’m guessing that at least one of you out there is saying, but Judy, I thought you didn’t eat bi-valves . . .? Well, that was then! It turns out that there’s pretty much nothing that I can’t eat.)

So, I actually got through the crowd into the store and bought some beautiful frozen scallops. More cheerful people in there! Taylor Shellfish Farms is headquartered south of Seattle in Shelton, Washington, and they also have a store up north near Samish Bay in the Skagit Valley, which is one of the most beautiful places on the globe. (Stay tuned for more on that!) But it will be super to have them here in town too.

I don’t go to Melrose Market without making time to hang around and visit my other favorite shops. I told you a little bit about Rain Shadow Meats yesterday. Proprietor Russell Flint, known locally as a chef but also with ten years’ experience in butchery, opened up about a year ago. He offers beautiful meats and meat products from local farmers, labeled with the name and locale of the provider. And the staff can answer any question you can think of (and the people who shop here can think of a lot of them!).

Across the way, The Calf and Kid owner Sheri LaVigne was heading out the door, but Erin Burgess got me up to speed on their new cheeses. After tasting pretty much everything she mentioned (probably not a great idea to offer me samples), I ended up getting two. The first is a chevre from Yarmouth Farms up in Darrington (I told you about one of their other cheeses in my very first post!)  I also got a raw sheep’s-milk cheese called Queso de Oreja from Adna, also in Washington. This one is a hard cheese similar to a manchego. How do I know that?–Because Erin explained it to me! That’s why I stick with shops like these, staffed by people who love what they are selling. You get a great product, you get an education, you feel like you’ve been chatting with a friend. What a great experience! (Visit Sheri’s blog for a running account of her sixteen months or so ramping up the business–also great stories!)

Cheese 101 from Calf & Kid

Fourteen cheeses in a couple of hours! –This was a true fromage-orama.

At the communal table in the restaurant Sitka and Spruce, Sheri LaVigne of The Calf & Kid started us off with small offerings of fresh chevre and sheep’s-milk ricotta, then took us on a clockwise tour of a plate of twelve cheeses, from soft-ripened to washed-rind to semi-firm and hard, finishing with a couple of blues. Oh, and along the way, she gave us a concise history of a couple of millenia of cheesemaking and cheesemakers!

What were my favorites?–It’s really hard to choose. Between the two “fresh” cheeses, I preferred the plain chevre from Briar Rose Creamery (Dundee, OR)–a very light, fluffy goat cheese. Among the four “soft-ripened” cheeses we tasted, The Le Pommier Camembert (a cow cheese from Herve Mons in Rhone-Alps, France) was beautifully mushroomy and earthy; its aroma just bloomed in my head.

Between the two “washed-rind” cheeses, I’d choose the Oma (raw cow’s milk cheese from Cellars at Jasper Hill, Von Trapp Farmstead–yes, those Von Trapps, Greensboro, VT)–an unusual grassy flavor that I really liked.

(Sidebar:  the whole question of the rind on cheese turns out to be a study of its own! But “washed-rind” means just what it says–the cheesemaker washes the surface of the cheese roughly weekly during the aging process with a brine solution or alcohol.)

The “semi-firm” cheeses were nice but not as striking or unusual as some of the others. The “hard” cheeses were both cheddars, and very tasty, but the news here was that “cheddar” is also a verb! In “cheddaring,” the cheese block (hunk? batch?–you get the idea) is cut into slices, then the bottom curd is put on top and the whole thing is pressed. Repeat, then repeat . . . This process eventually produces that wonderfully crumbly texture that cheddar has.

For me the big finish was the blues, especially the raw cow’s-milk Caveman Blue from Rogue Creamery in Central Point, OR. This is one pungent cheese, no question about it!–Sheri says it smells like “a skunk died in a sweat sock.” But get through the smell and put it in your mouth!–meltingly  rich and aromatic. Plus, it looks like marble–the blue veins are large and smoky, rippling through the butter-colored cheese.

It turns out that many local cheesemakers do cheese-making classes on their farms! So, for those who love cheese, stay tuned for field trips. For the rest of you, class is dismissed!

You can learn about the cheeses of the Northwest in the “bible”: Artisan Cheese of the Pacific Northwest, by Tami Parr (see my post for 2/23; I got the book!).

You can follow Sheri on Blogspot:
http://calfandkid.blogspot.com/